MyBrookdale

Fall 2014 Online Course List

The following courses will be offered in the Fall 15-Week Term, which runs from September 4 – December 20, 2014


Fall 2014 Online Courses

ACCT 101 – Principles of Accounting I

An introduction to basic concepts and principles of recording and posting financial information, preparation of trial balance, worksheet and financial statements. Current assets and liabilities are emphasized.  Prerequisites are MATH 012, MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation; and READ 092, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading.
Credits: 3

ACCT 102 – Principles of Accounting II

This course is a continuation of ACCT 101.  It introduces partnership and corporate accounting.  Long-term assets and liabilities, cash flow and analysis of financial statements are emphasized.  Prerequisite:  ACCT 101.
Credits:  3

ANTH 105 – Cultural Anthropology

The student will investigate the concepts of culture and apply them to different cultures of the world. The student will determine the universal aspects of each culture concept and investigate the development and consequences of culture’s evolution from simple to complex.
Credits:  3

ANTH 116 – Introduction to Physical Anthropology

Students will study humans as primates as they study the place of humans in nature. They will consider how physical anthropology can be applied to studies of forensics and medical anthropology. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term.
Credits:  3

ARTH 105 – Art Appreciation

Students will discuss the nature of aesthetics in general and art in particular. They will demonstrate an understanding of such essential principles as form, unity, space, color, balance and emphasis, and will be able to identify and analyze the works of selected artists from historical periods. Field trips may be required. Prerequisite: READ 092, READ 095 or passing score in reading on Basic Skills Test; and ENGL 095 or passing score in English on Basic Skills Test.
Credits: 3

BIOL 105 – Life Sciences

This course is intended to meet a laboratory science requirement for the non-science major. Through laboratory exercises and classroom experiences the student will demonstrate an appreciation of life phenomena and the diversity of living organisms. Topics include basic metabolic functions that create and sustain life, reproduction, growth, development, behavior and adaptation of selected life forms and the interactions among living organisms. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in MATH 012, MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skill test requirement in writing. Credit: 4

BIOL 126 – Exploring Biology: Cycles of Life

Exploring Biology: Cycles of Life is a general study of the basic concepts of biology for the non-science major.  Topics include: chemistry in life, cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, diversity of life and ecology.  Topics are covered at an introductory level to provide students an overview of biological science and its relevance in the world.   Prerequisite: MATH 012, or MATH 015 or passing score in computation of Basic Skills Tests, READ 095 or passing score in reading on Basic Skills Test, and ENGL 095 or passing score in writing on Basic Skills Test
Credits:  3

BUSI 105 – Introduction To Business

In this survey course, the student will receive and an overview of functional areas of business and learn the basics concepts of the business world.  Some topics covered include management, managing human resources, labor relations, ethics, and social responsibility, accounting, money and banking, securities and investments, marketing and globalization.  Upon completion of this course, students will understand the various forms of business ownership and the free enterprise system and how it contrasts with other systems.  This course will assist the student in making career choices and will serve as an entry level foundation course.  Prerequisite: READ 092  or READ 095 or a passing score in reading on Basic Skills Test
Credit: 3

BUSI 165 – Computer Applications In Business

This is an introductory-level course for students with basic computer knowledge and provides a “hands-on” laboratory experience.  The student will develop a working knowledge of the computer and work with a variety of software programs such as word processing, spreadsheets, database construction, and income tax preparation.  The student will also learn programs such as graphic presentations, record keeping, and loan analysis, as well as learn how to conduct research on the Internet and communicate via email.  Students will demonstrate the use of these programs to interpret and analyze diverse economic and financial situations in their personal and professional lives.  Prerequisite:  MATH 012, MATH 015, or passing score in computation on Basic Skills test and READ 092, READ 095 or passing score in reading on Basic Skills Test
Credits: 3

BUSI 205 – Principles of Management

The student will develop an insight into the basic concepts, functions and techniques of administrative management.  The student will obtain specific knowledge of how to manage the planning, organizing, leading and controlling that is involved in any type of organization.  Upon completion of the course, the student will have an understanding of the principles of good management.  Prerequisite: BUSI 105 or permission of instructor
Credits:  3

BUSI 221 – Business Law I

The student will identify, define and describe contracts, agency, employment, wills, bailment, personal and real property.
Credits: 3

CHEM 101 – General Chemistry

The student will investigate the fundamental concepts of chemistry from a theoretical approach and participate in a laboratory program that demonstrates this theory. The subjects covered include atomic structure, chemical bonding, acids and bases, gases, solids and liquids and properties of solutions. The course content is designed for the science major who wishes to transfer to a four-year institution. (Prerequisites: HS Chemistry or a grade of “C” or higher in CHEM 100 or equivalent, and a grade of “C” or higher in MATH 151)

Credits: 5

CHEM 116 – Chemistry in Life

This chemistry course for non-science majors will focus on the role chemistry plays in maintaining and improving our quality of life. Topics include environmental issues such as air pollution, acid rain and recycling; the study of energy sources including nuclear power; and health issues such as nutrition and world hunger. The accompanying lab involves the study of common items found in everyday life.

Prerequisite: MATH 012 or MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation.

Credits: 4

Students do lab work in this section—DO NOT sign up for separate lab section

CHEM 136 – Introduction to Inorganic, Organic, and Biological Chemistry

The student will consider selected concepts from inorganic, organic and biological chemistry which will be applied to allied health and biological fields. Skills will be developed in a laboratory program which enhances topics under consideration. The program is designed for students who have had no previous chemistry course.

Credits: 4

CINE 105 – Film Appreciation

The students will view a wide range of short and feature length films and be able to identify the major film theories, the basic techniques of filmmaking and the basic characteristics of the film medium as art and entertainment.

Credits: 3

COMP 129 – Information Technology

This course is a rigorous introduction to computer science and computer applications. This course emphasizes common computer/technology skills and helps students access, process and present information. This course contains a component that helps the student to recognize, analyze and assess ethical issues and situations in computer science.

Prerequisite: READ 095 is recommended. Students are required to take multiple tests in-person.

Credits: 3

CRJU 101 – Introduction to Criminal Justice

The social and institutional response to crime is discussed topically in this interdisciplinary survey of the American Criminal Justice System. Students are required to formulate views on controversial issues and concerns such as plea bargaining, the exclusionary rule, the insanity defense and the death penalty. This course is a prerequisite for all 200 level courses in the Criminal Justice program.
Credits: 3

CRJU 245 – Delinquency and Juvenile Justice

The course will examine the social and behavioral causes of delinquency. In addition, the historical background, legal rights and procedural problems of the juvenile justice system will be reviewed. Students will be expected to: identify and describe four separate theories of delinquency, distinguish the practices and procedures of the adult justice system from the juvenile justice system and explain recent reforms and innovations in deliquency prevention, punishment and treatment. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in CRJU 101)
Credits: 3

ECON 105 – Macro Economics

Students will understand how a market economy operates using the fundamental principles of supply and demand. They will be able to relate the significance of unemployment, inflation and other indicators to our nation’s economy. They will be able to explain the effects of monetary and fiscal policy and the impact of foreign trade on the phenomenon of economic growth. Prerequisites: MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation, READ 092 or READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading, and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing.

Credits: 3

ECON 106 – Micro Economics

Students will understand principles of supply and demand including sensitivity analysis to price, income and utility. They will analyze cost under various market structures. Both the output and input markets will be examined.

Prerequisites: MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation, READ 092 or READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading, and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing.

Credits: 3

ECON 225 – Business Statistics

Students will summarize statistical data, both graphically and as measures of center and dispersion. Discrete and continuous probability, sampling techniques, distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, regression, time series analysis and index numbers are also covered.

Prerequisites: MATH 021, MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra.

Credits: 3

ENGL 121 – English Composition: The Writing Process

English 121 is an introductory writing course where students compose and revise narrative and expository essays and prepare for the study of literature by using writing to analyze texts. Through a writers’ workshop approach, students explore the writing process, respond to a variety of texts and learn to communicate their ideas effectively and confidently in writing.

Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 095, ENGL 097 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing.

Credits: 3

ENGL 122 – English Composition: Writing and Research

This course teaches techniques and strategies for conducting research and for writing effectively on a range of subjects. Students learn to write and revise convincing papers using critical thinking skills and information they find to support an assertion or position. Related reasoning and support for papers necessitates inquiry into social ethics and moral situations. Students learn to analyze and process this information using foundational principles of logic, ethical reasoning, and social morals. Students also learn and demonstrate proper documentation style.

Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 121.

Credits: 3

ENGL 158 – Introduction to Literature

This course is a fundamental overview of literature for those who love to read and for those who have previously been intimidated by literature courses. It teaches terminology of the four major genres of literature, (poetry, drama, short story and the novel) and the literary movements that have shaped these genres from the Classicism of Aristotle to the Anti-realism of MTV. This course stresses easy techniques for effectively answering essay questions, for writing papers for literature courses, and for more efficient studying.

Credits: 3

ENGL 155 – The Short Story

Students will read and discuss short stories drawn from the literature of many cultures and countries. They will analyze the stories for the theme, form, relationship to their own lives and reflection of various cultures. The relevance of these short stories for the modern reader will be examined.

Credits: 3

ENGL 170 – Introduction to Social Media

This course teaches strategies and techniques for the utilization of Social Media applications for the purpose of creating a personal or professional web presence for a person or brand. Students will learn to effectively use current social media sites to interact appropriately with their intended audience within the realm of the feeds best suited for their intended promotions and objectives.

Credits: 3

ENGL 221 – Creative Writing

The student will plan, write and revise fiction and nonfiction, including short stories, poetry, articles and novels. Help will be available for writers who have not yet broken into print and for those who want to prepare manuscripts for publication.

Credits: 3

ENGL 235 – World Literature I

The student will read and respond to masterpieces of world literature from earliest times to the 18th century. The works’ relevance for contemporary readers will be examined. This broad based exploration of the ancient world, as seen through its literary art, exposes students to a wide variety of cultures, histories and regions. Those regions include works from Africa, the Middle East, China, Japan, India, Central Asia, the Americas and Europe.

Prerequisite: ENGL 095, ENGL 097 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing; READ 092, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading.

Credits: 3

ENGL 245 – American Literature I

This survey of Early American literature from the Puritans to Walt Whitman covers such writers as Ann Bradstreet, Ben Franklin, Jonathan Edwards, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Emerson and others. Emphasis is placed on literary movements like Transcendentalism, as well as on how American literature reflects American culture.

Credits: 3

ENGL 246 – American Literature II

Students will read works reflecting America’s literary growth and evolution in the 20th century. Major writers will be studied in an effort to determine their stature and influence of American literature.

This course requires students to complete weekly reading assignments, view online videos, participate in a weekly online discussion, research and write a term paper, and complete online interactive learning experiences.

Credits: 3

ENVR 107 – Environmental Science

This introductory laboratory science course integrates the biological, chemical, political, and economic aspects of the environment as they relate to environmental sustainability, pollution, natural resource conservation, and the enactment of environmental policies. The course draws on the foundations of ecology to understand how human population growth and resulting technology affect individual species, biodiversity, and ecosystem health. The laboratory component of the course will, through field experiences, computer simulations, and laboratory analyses, employ the scientific method of inquiry as a tool to analyze real-world environmental data to quantify human impacts leading to potential solutions to environmental problems. Students will not receive credit for both ENVR-105 and ENVR-107. Students should select either ENVR-105 or ENVR-107 based on general education requirements or career goals. Students completing ENVR-105 prior to Fall 2009 should consult their counselor before registering for ENVR-107.

Prerequisites or Corequisites: MATH-021, MATH-025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra, READ-092, READ-095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading.

Credits: 4

HESC 115 – Nutrition and Health

Students are introduced to the basic concepts of nutrition. Emphasis will be placed on practical information that will enable students to make judgments about their food intake and gain awareness of the critical role of nutrition in health care. Concepts from biology, chemistry and physiology are used as a basis for the exploration of the role of nutrition in health.

Credits: 3

HIST 125 – Women’s History Survey: Experiences, Contributions, and Debates

A survey of the experiences, lives and contribution of women to American history. The student will study women’s changing roles through history, as well as the diversity of women’s experience on a racial, ethnic and class basis. Problems and solutions women have faced in the past will be discussed with an emphasis on understanding the participation of women in America, to uncover and restore women’s achievements and experiences.

Credits: 3

HIST 135 – American Civilization I

Students will identify and discuss problems, events and personalities in American history which have influenced the origins and growth of the Republic from the colonial period until the Civil War (1861). History will be viewed from many perspectives.

Credits: 3

HIST 106 – World Civilization II

The course will examine the major developments in human history from 1500 to the present. It will focus on the elements involved in Europe’s self-transformation into a modern society as seen in its intellectual, industrial and imperialist movements, and the world wars. Emphasis will also be placed on the history of Asian, African, Middle Eastern and Latin American societies and the impact of imperialism of those cultures; their reactions to, interaction with, and finally independence from Western dominance in the 20th century will also be explored.

Credits: 3

HIST 107 – Contemporary World History

This course is designed to provide students with the framework of the contemporary world which will be discussed by examining key historical developments since 1945, including the Cold War and the fall of communism, as well as the independence movements and revolutions in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East. Relying on a variety of historical readings and current accounts, emphasis will be placed on understanding the historical readings and contemporary issues such as international conflict, the environment, human and natural resources and global cultural and economic trends.

Credits: 3

HIST 136 – American Civilization II

Students will demonstrate an understanding of personalities, events and problems in American history from the Civil War (1865) until World War II (1941).

Credits: 3

HIST 137 – Recent American History

The student will recognize and assess the major forces that have shaped the course of American domestic and foreign policies since World War II (1945). The student will analyze the inter-relationship and consequences of foreign and domestic events.

Credits: 3

HIST 205 – History of World War II

The student will study the military, political, social and economic history of World War II, stressing both America’s role and worldwide implications. The student will investigate the causes, events and outcomes of World War II. An understanding of this cataclysmic event will also necessitate knowing the leading personalities of the conflict and their goals and motivations.

Credits: 3

HITC 120 – Reimbursement Methodologies

This course provides students the opportunity to learn the history, rationale, and methodology of the systems used by third party payers to determine the reimbursement that health care providers will receive. Reimbursement concepts include fee-for-service, managed care, capitation systems, Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRGs), Resource Based Value Scale (RBRVS), Ambulatory Payment Classifications (APCs), and related concepts. The use of the charge description master (chargemaster) in reimbursement will be discussed. The importance of compliance with regulations and the related issues of fraud and abuse will also be addressed.(Prerequisite or co-requisite: HITC-121)

Credits: 3

HITC 221 – Coding and Classification System I

In this course the student will study the principles of coding and classification systems with an emphasis on the Health Care Financing Administration’s Common Procedural Coding System (HCPCSA) and Current Procedural Coding (CPT).

Credits: 4

HITC 222 – HIT Systems and Technology

This course introduces the student to computer applications in health information services. Data entry, display, abstracting and retrieval will be emphasized. The electronic record and future directions in information systems will also be discussed.(Prerequisite: HITC-121)

Credits: 3

HITC 223 – Health Information Reporting

This course addresses medical statistics and quality improvement. It includes topics such as sources and use of health data and computations commonly used by health care facilities. In addition quality indicators and the principles of performance improvement are covered.(Prerequisite or co-requisite: HITC-121)
Credits: 3

HITC 224 – Coding and Classification System II

In this course the student will study the principles of coding and classification systems with an emphasis on the Health Care Financing Administration’s Common Procedural Coding system (HCPCS) and Current Procedural Coding (CPT).

Credits: 4

HUMN 129 – Issues in Women’s Studies

This course provides an exploration of the field of women’s studies and includes an analysis of women’s lives through readings in a wide range of topics from the new scholarship on gender. Students will be requested to write response papers as well as to read from a variety of texts. Research writing will also be included. Guest speakers will contribute a variety of perspectives from different areas of women’s experiences.

Credits: 3

JOUR 101 – Introduction to Journalism

Students learn to develop and evaluate sources of information, to analyze audience needs, to develop a sense of importance, to write concisely and clearly and to background themselves quickly. The course emphasizes clarity and conciseness in writing and examines those techniques in successful writing for both fiction and nonfiction. Students also gain an understanding of what makes news, who decides what becomes news and how media decide what to publish or broadcast. (Prerequisite: ENGL-095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing)

Credits: 3

MATH 025 – Elementary Algebra

This course is a review of elementary algebra and requires previous experience in algebra. The course is intended for students who need to take MATH 151 or MATH 161. The topics include linear equations and inequalities, functions and function notations, graphs and equations of linear functions, systems of linear equations, polynomial and exponential expressions, factoring, quadratic equations, rational and radical expressions and equations. Problem solving is stressed throughout the course. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic. A graphing calculator is required – the specific model is determined by the department. This is a developmental course in the basic skills and will not be counted towards degree requirements. NOTE: Students taking MATH 025 may not enroll simultaneously in any other math course.

Prerequisite: MATH 015 or MATH 012, or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation. Please note that in-person testing is required.

Credits: 4

MATH 131 – Statistics

This course begins with descriptive statistics, including graphical representation of data and measures of central tendency, position and variation. Basic probability concepts lead to the study of the binomial and normal probability distributions. The course continues with the Central Limit Theorem and its use in the development of estimation through confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. The course concludes with Chi Square tests and linear correlation and regression. Computer software will be used in class to gain a greater understanding of underlying concepts.

Prerequisite: MATH 021 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra. Please note that in-person testing is required.

Credits: 4

MATH 136 – Mathematics for the Liberal Arts

This is a mathematics survey course that covers sets, logic and two topics chosen from probability, numeration systems, geometry, consumer mathematics, and graph theory.

Prerequisite: MATH 021 or MATH 025, or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra. Please note that in-person testing is required.

Credits: 3

MATH 151 – Intermediate Algebra

This course prepares students for courses that require algebraic skills beyond those taught in Elementary Algebra. Topics include equations, inequalities, linear systems in two and three variables, complex numbers and applications of functions: linear, exponential, logarithmic, quadratic, polynomial, rational and radical. In addition, the course provides a basic introduction to right triangle trigonometry, vectors, and the Laws of Sines and Cosines. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal and algebraic. A graphing calculator is required – the specific model is determined by the department.

Prerequisite: MATH 022 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra. Please note that in-person testing is required.

Credits: 4

MRKT 101 – Introduction to Marketing

The student will master the fundamentals of marketing and marketing theory. The students will study theories relevant to marketing and the business environment, marketing and the social environment, research, product strategies and development, distribution, promotion and pricing. Prerequisite: READ 092, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading

Credits: 3

MRKT 115 – Social Media Marketing

This course will explain, define, illustrate and apply the ways in which businesses can maximize their marketing efforts through the integration of social media with current marketing strategies. The course will cover the growth and future of social media; how consumers respond to and interact with social media; how businesses can develop an effective social media campaign; how to set social media marketing goals; and how to measure results of social media marketing campaigns.

Prerequisite: READ-092, READ-095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirements in reading.

Credits: 3

MUSI 115 – Music Appreciation

MUSI 115 OL is an online interactive course in Music Appreciation. Students who register for the course will purchase a CD set in the bookstore. It will enable students to register and access the course from an Internet site. All course work (with the exception of concert attendance) can be accessed from any PC with Internet access. The instructor will evaluate all course materials via the Internet and e-mail. Concert attendance (3 concerts) is a mandatory requirement. All concerts will be on the Brookdale main campus or in the immediate vicinity.

Credits: 3

CONCERT ATTENDANCE IS REQUIRED.

MUSI 116 – History of Jazz

The legacy of jazz is uniquely indigenous to the American experience, in that it combines the musical traditions of three distinct ethnic groups: the Western European tradition, African music and the newly emerging American tradition of the late 19th century. The History of Jazz will concentrate on Jazz music from its origins to present day developments. The musical style traits of different periods will be discussed from a non-technical point of view, making the material understandable to non-musicians. Historical and sociological factors will also be considered. The objectives will be accomplished through class discussion, selected listening, required concerts, and film viewings. Attendance at three concerts is mandatory.

Credits: 3

CONCERT ATTENDANCE IS REQUIRED

NEWT 106 – Introduction to Networking TCP/IP

The objective of this course is to provide students with a practical understanding of networking and the skills required to setup and use TCP/IP networks.  Instruction will include demonstration and hands-on experience of networking and TCP/IP concepts.  Additionally, this course provides students with an overview of the facilities and services provided by the TCP/IP suite and others.  It is useful for students who wish to understand networking concepts with TCP/IP or make decisions about implementing a TCP/IP network.  The course concentrates on the Windows Operating System with TCP/IP implementation.

Credits: 3

 

NURS 160 – Introduction to Human Needs

The first course in the Nursing Program introduces the student to the practice of professional nursing, the Human Needs framework, health assessment and the elements of reasoning used in critical thinking. Students will learn to calculate medications, use basic communication interventions and engage in strategies that will promote success in the program.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Nursing Program

Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 111 and PSYC 106

Course content will be accessed over the Internet and required in-person proctored testing on campus. 3 hours lab will be required each week at Meridian hospital (day, time and location to be announced.)

Credits: 3

NURS 161 – Nursing and Human Needs I

This Nursing Course focuses on the Human Needs Framework, health assessment and the elements of reasoning used in critical thinking. The student uses caring interventions, communication techniques and teaching/learning interventions to care for adult, geriatric and oncology clients. Prerequisite: BIOL 111, PSYC 106 and NURS 160.

Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 112 and PSYC 208

Course content will be accessed over the Internet. Course requires in person testing on campus. See Master Schedule for clinical sections. Additional weekly lab hours are required.

Credits: 7

NURS 162 – Basic Needs in the Community

In Nursing 162, the student uses the Human Needs Framework to care for individuals undergoing surgery and for those with alterations in mobility. The needs of the childbearing and child-caring family and issues of human sexuality are also addressed.

Prerequisites: NURS 161, BIOL 112 and PSYC 208

Prerequisite of Corequisite: BIOL 213

Credits: 8

NURS 163 – Nursing and Human Needs in the Community

This course examines human needs in the community. The influence of the family, cultural diversity and financial concerns on the delivery of community-based care is explored. In addition, the varied roles and practice settings of the community-based nurse and the basic principles of epidemiology are discussed.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Nursing program.

Credits: 2

NURS 165 – Issues in Nursing

This course introduces students to current issues in nursing and health care. A range of topics is explored from philosophical, theoretical, ethical, social, economic, historical and research perspectives. A critical thinking approach that incorporates the elements of reasoning and universal intellectual standards focuses the student on generating new thoughts, understandings, beliefs and insights.

Credits: 2

NURS 261 – Nursing and Human Needs III

In Nursing III, the student uses the Human Needs Framework to care for Individuals with alterations in mental health, oxygenation, tissue perfusion and metabolism.

Prerequisites: NURS 162 and BIOL 213

Credits: 8

NURS 262 – Nursing and Human Needs IV

In Nursing 262, students use the Human Needs Framework to care for clients with alterations in nutrition, absorption, elimination, sensation and perception.

Prerequisite: NURS 261

Credits: 6

NURS 263 – Managing and Coordinating Nursing Care

In Managing and Coordinating Nursing Care, students use the Human Needs Framework to integrate nursing management concepts and principles in planning the care of groups of clients in the acute care setting.

Prerequisite: NURS 262

NOTE: NURSING 262 students will need to flex their clinical hours to follow the preceptor’s schedule and will vary on a weekly basis.

Student will be required to attend an in class orientation and have in person proctored testing on the Lincroft Campus. See Master Schedule for clinical sections.

Credits: 3

PHIL 105 – Practical Reasoning

The focus of this course is the development of student’s analytic skills. Students will evaluate claims, distinguish arguments from explanations, identify examples of Pseudo-reasoning and use inductive generalizations. problem-solving will be the primary mode of learning.

Prerequisite: READ 092, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading)

Credits: 3

PHIL 115 – Introduction to Philosophy

Students investigate key issues in philosophy, including the nature of self, knowledge and truth, freedom and determinism, morality, the nature of the universe, the existence of God, death and afterlife, meaning and purpose. Emphasis will be given to clarifying students’ own thinking on these issues through reading, reflection and discussion.

Prerequisite: READ 092, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading

Credits: 3

PHIL 227 – Introduction to Ethics

Students will become familiar with many approaches to deciding what is “right” and “wrong” in human behavior. The course begins with a look at several ethical theories, each intended to provide a framework for moral decision-making. The second part of the course involves discussion of many controversial issues such as the taking of human life, sexual behavior, abortion, business, medical practice, etc. (Certain sections of the course will be designated to focus on questions within one particular area, e.g., Business Ethics, Nursing Ethics, Environmental Ethics.)

Prerequisite: READ 092, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading.

Credits: 3

PLGL 135 – Family Law

The purpose of the Family Law Course is to give legal assistants an understanding of domestic relations law. Students will learn how the laws governing family situations are applied. The content of the course covers dissolution, child custody, child support, alimony, property settlement agreements, orders to show cause, domestic violence and adoption. The students will be able to define and differentiate between the various grounds for divorce and annulment, and they will be able to prepare all forms and pleadings necessary for divorce, and annulment proceedings. This course is designed to give an overview of the law, rules of procedure, ethical and professional responsibilities and tasks essential to the role of the paralegal in assisting the attorney in the family law litigation process.  (Prerequisite or Corequisite: PLGL-105)
Credits: 3

 

POLI 101 – Introduction to Political Science

As an introductory course in Political Science, students examine basic concepts of democracy and dictatorship, the nation-state, law, ideology, interest groups and political parties. Course activities include the use of teacher and guest lectures, small group discussion, student presentation and video offerings.

Credits: 3

POLI 105 – American National Government

Students in American National Government study the structure and philosophy of the United States government, including themes of national economy, energy, environment, health, education, welfare, civil rights, civil liberties, foreign policy and political parties. Course activities include the use of teacher and guest lectures, small group discussion, student presentations and video offerings.

Credits: 3

POLI 115 – State, County and Local Government

The student will study the structure and philosophy of state, county and local governments within the United States – though particular attention is given to these themes as they apply in New Jersey. Topics include the economy, energy, environment, health, education, welfare, law enforcement, political parties, civil rights and civil liberties. Course activities include the use of teacher and guest lectures, small group discussion, student presentations and video offerings.

Credits: 3

PSYC 105 – Introduction to Psychology I

Students will demonstrate an understanding of psychology as a science. They will complete exercises covering fundamental areas of the discipline: history of psychology, scientific method, sensation and perception, learning and memory, IQ and personality testing. Students will gain the ability to examine these subjects from a critical as well as diverse point of view; the roles of gender, cultural and individual differences are systematically explored. Service-learning is an option.

Credits: 3

PSYC 106 – Introduction to Psychology II

Students will demonstrate an understanding of Psychology as an applied science. They will complete exercises covering: social and interpersonal behavior, motivation, emotion, psychological disorders, personality theories and the psychotherapies. Students will gain the ability to analyze a variety of theoretical perspectives from critical and diverse points of view while applying them to problems of daily living. Service-learning is an option.

Credits: 3

PSYC 206 – Human Growth and Development I

The student will demonstrate an understanding of development from birth through adolescence. Emphasis will be placed on different theoretical views of development and reactions to them. The student will validate important concepts with theories, laboratory experience and research findings. Prerequisite: PSYC 105 or PSYC 106

Credits: 3

PSYC 208 – Life Span Development

This course in Life Span Human Development examines age changes in behavior from conception through the end of the life cycle. Milestones in physical, cognitive and social development are charted for each stage of the life cycle. Students will see how each unique life structure is shaped by numerous internal and external influences. By integrating experimental research findings with theories and case studies, students will be able to refine their own developmental perspective. Principles of human development, theoretical perspectives and experimental research data will be measured against each student’s experiences and personal observations. Prerequisite: PSYC 105 or PSYC 106

Credits: 3

PSYC 209 – Theories of Personality

In this course, students are introduced to the major thinkers, concepts, and trends within the field of personality study. This is accomplished via an introduction to the ideas of selected major personality theorists from the history of western psychology. Emphasis is placed upon understanding how these theorists view the development of personality and the implications of each theory’s assumptions regarding human nature. Students are asked to grapple with such fundamental questions as: What factors may influence the development of personality? How are various personality theories similar and different? How are individual personalities similar and different?

Prerequisite: PSYC 106

Credits: 3

PSYC 216 – Abnormal Psychology

The students will demonstrate knowledge of the descriptions, natural history and psychodynamics of various types of abnormal behavior in order to function effectively as a member of a treatment team. Students are required to spend 10 hours in field work to practice observation skills.

Prerequisites: PSYC 105 or PSYC 106; PSYC 111 required for Human Services Program majors.

Credits: 3

PSYC 218 – Educational Psychology

This course is designed to assist students with the application of psychological principles to classrooms at all educational levels. Topics include: cognitive development, learning theories, motivation, multicultural issues, and student assessment. Course activities include the use of instructor and guest lectures, small group discussion, and student presentations.

Credits: 3

PSYC 245 – Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Science Research

Students will find, read and analyze published research in the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Students will engage in and analyze various methods of social science research and also learn the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistics. Students will be introduced to the use of computers and the use of state-of-the-art statistical programs and will begin to develop effective research and data analysis skills. Students will have the option of enrolling in an additional one-credit laboratory course designed to develop their skills in research design and statistical and data analysis using statistical software packages.

Prerequisite: MATH 021 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra and at least one of the following courses with a “C” or better: PSYC 105, PSYC 106, SOCI 101, CRJU 101 or POLI 101.

Credits: 3

RADT 150 – Introduction to Radiologic Technology

This introductory course provides a basic foundation for the practice of radio-logic technology.  It provides fundamental concepts of radiation protection principles and image development and processing concepts.  (Co-requisite: RADT-151, RADT-152 and RADT-153)

Credits: 2

SOCI 101 – Principles of Sociology

Sociology is a new look at the familiar world of everyday life. In this introductory course students will use the sociological perspective to analyze and understand their relationships to the various groups and social categories that constitute modern society. They will investigate the major concepts of deviance, social class and inequity, as well as family related issues including those of gender and aging.

Prerequisite: READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading.

Credits: 3

SOCI 105 – Intercultural Communications: The Person and the Process

Students will develop a personal and theoretical understanding of the cultural origin of various people’s values, ideologies, habit and idiosyncrasies, and how they effect communication across cultural, racial, ethnic and gender lines. Through observing, simulating and experiencing incidents of cross-cultural communication, they will begin to examine and develop skills that are necessary for effective communication among majority and minority groups.

Credits: 3

SOCI 216 – Sociology of Minorities

This course examines the inter-relationship between race, class, gender and ethnicity and how these structures have shaped the experience of all people in America. A sociological and historical perspective is applied to analyze how a social configuration characterized by cultural diversity affects the individual consciousness, group interaction and group access to institutional power and privileges. SOCI 101 is recommended, but not required. NOTE: This course is only offered in the Spring Term.

Credits: 3

SPAN 101 – Elementary Spanish Communication I

This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge, or very limited knowledge, of the Spanish language. Strong emphasis will be placed on acquiring conversational and comprehension skills, using practical and interesting situational materials that will stress both language and culture. Grammatical patterns and syntax will be introduced with the aim that students read and write what they have learned to say and understand. (This course is not open to native Spanish speakers or to students with more than two years of Spanish in high school, except by instructor approval)

Credits: 4

SPAN 102 – Elementary Spanish Communication II

Students will build upon skills acquired in the first semester course and will be able to express themselves in a variety of more complex situations in Spanish. Prerequisite: a “C” or higher in SPAN 101 or instructor approval

Credits: 4

SPCH 115 – Public Speaking

Students will develop the public speaking skills central to success in academic, business and professional life. Students who complete SPCH 115 will have performed informative, persuasive and demonstrative speeches which exhibit competence in academic research, technological literacy, ethical reasoning, critical thinking, organization and extemporaneous delivery.

Students enrolled in the online section of Public Speaking must have access to video cameras for recording speeches. These recordings will be submitted to the instructor for evaluation. Students will participate in online discussions with others enrolled in the course. Additionally, students will be required to perform speeches in front of a live audience on campus and/or locate, deliver and videotape speeches in front of a suitable audience in the community of at least 8 people. Please see website for specific list of equipment needed.

Credits: 3