MyBrookdale

Spring 2018 Online Courses

ACCT-101 - Principles of Accounting

An introduction to basic concepts and principles of recording and posting financial information, preparation of trial balance, worksheet, and financial statements. Current assets and liabilities are emphasized. Prerequisites are MATH 012, MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation; and READ 092, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading.
Credits: 3

ACCT-102 - Principles of Accounting II

This course is a continuation of ACCT 101. It introduces partnership and corporate accounting. Long-term assets and liabilities, cash flow and analysis of financial statements are emphasized. Prerequisite:  ACCT 101.
Credits:  3

ANTH-105 - Cultural Anthropology

The student will investigate the concepts of culture and apply them to different cultures of the world. The student will determine the universal aspects of each culture concept and investigate the development and consequences of culture’s evolution from simple to complex.
Credits:  3

ARTH-105 - Art Appreciation

Students will discuss the nature of aesthetics in general and art in particular. They will demonstrate an understanding of such essential principles as form, unity, space, color, balance and emphasis, and will be able to identify and analyze the works of selected artists from historical periods. Field trips may be required. Prerequisite: READ 092, READ 095 or passing score in reading on Basic Skills Test; and ENGL 095 or passing score in English on Basic Skills Test.

Credits: 3

ARTH-106 - History of Art: Ancient Through Medieval

The student will survey the history of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Ancient through Medieval period with emphasis on stylistic analysis and the relationship of art to its cultural and historical center.  Field trips may be required.  Prerequisite: READ 092, READ 095 or passing score in reading on Basic Skills Test; and ENGL 121
Credits: 3

ARTH-107 - Art: Renaissance/Contemporary

The student will survey the history of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Ancient through Medieval period with emphasis on stylistic analysis and the relationship of art to its cultural and historical center.  Field trips may be required.  Prerequisite: READ 092, READ 095 or passing score in reading on Basic Skills Test; and ENGL 121

Credits: 3

BIOL-105 - Life Sciences

This course is intended to meet a laboratory science requirement for the non-science major.  Through laboratory exercises and classroom experiences the student will demonstrate an appreciation of life phenomena and the diversity of living organisms.  Topics include basic metabolic functions that create and sustain life, reproduction, growth, development, behavior and adaptation of selected life forms and the interactions among living organisms.  Prerequisite:  A grade of C or higher in MATH 012, MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skill test requirement in writing.
Credits:  4

BIOL-126 - Exploring Biology: Cycles of Life

Exploring Biology: Cycles of Life is a general study of the basic concepts of biology for the non-science major.  Topics include: chemistry in life, cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, diversity of life and ecology.  Topics are covered at an introductory level to provide students an overview of biological science and its relevance in the world.   Prerequisite: MATH 012, or MATH 015 or passing score in computation of Basic Skills Tests, READ 095 or passing score in reading on Basic Skills Test, and ENGL 095 or passing score in writing on Basic Skills Test
Credits: 3

BUSI-105 - Introduction To Business

In this survey course, the student will receive and an overview of functional areas of business and learn the basics concepts of the business world.  Some topics covered include management, managing human resources, labor relations, ethics, and social responsibility, accounting, money and banking, securities and investments, marketing and globalization.  Upon completion of this course, students will understand the various forms of business ownership and the free enterprise system and how it contrasts with other systems.  This course will assist the student in making career choices and will serve as an entry level foundation course.  Prerequisite: READ 092  or READ 095 or a passing score in reading on Basic Skills Test
Credits: 3

BUSI-165 - Computer Applications In Business

This is an introductory-level course for students with basic computer knowledge and provides a “hands-on” laboratory experience.  The student will develop a working knowledge of the computer and work with a variety of software programs such as word processing, spreadsheets, database construction, and income tax preparation.  The student will also learn programs such as graphic presentations, record keeping, and loan analysis, as well as learn how to conduct research on the Internet and communicate via email.  Students will demonstrate the use of these programs to interpret and analyze diverse economic and financial situations in their personal and professional lives.  Prerequisite:  MATH 012, MATH 015, or passing score in computation on Basic Skills test and READ 092, REAT 095 or passing score in reading on Basic Skills Test
Credits: 3

BUSI-205 - Principles of Management

The student will develop an insight into the basic concepts, functions and techniques of administrative management.  The student will obtain specific knowledge of how to manage the planning, organizing, leading and controlling that is involved in any type of organization.  Upon completion of the course, the student will have an understanding of the principles of good management.  Prerequisite: BUSI 105 or permission of instructor
Credits:  3

BUSI-221 - Business Law I

The student will identify, define and describe contracts, agency, employment, wills, bailment, personal and real property.
Credits: 3

CHEM-101 - General Chemistry I

The student will investigate the fundamental concepts of chemistry from a theoretical approach and participate in a laboratory program that demonstrates this theory. The subjects covered include atomic structure, chemical bonding, acids and bases, gases, solids and liquids and properties of solutions. The course content is designed for the science major who wishes to transfer to a four-year institution. (Prerequisites: HS Chemistry or a grade of “C” or higher in CHEM 100 or equivalent, and a grade of “C” or higher in MATH 151)
Credits: 5

CHEM-102 - General Chemistry II

A continuation of CHEM 101, the student will investigate the areas of kinetics, equilibrium, nuclear reactions, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, carbon chemistry and transition metal and organic chemistry using a problem solving approach to bring about understanding. (Prerequisite: MATH-151 and a grade of “C” or higher in CHEM-101)
Credits: 5

CHEM-116 - Chemistry In Life

This chemistry course for non-science majors will focus on the role chemistry plays in maintaining and improving our quality of life. Topics include environmental issues such as air pollution, acid rain and recycling; the study of energy sources including nuclear power; and health issues such as nutrition and world hunger. The accompanying lab involves the study of common items found in everyday life.  Prerequisite: MATH 012 or MATH 015 or passing score in computation on Basic Skills Test
Credits: 4
Students do lab work in this section – DO NOT sign up for separate lab section.

CHEM-136 - Introduction to Inorganic, Organic, and Biological Chemistry

The student will consider selected concepts from inorganic, organic, and biological chemistry which will be applied to allied health and biological fields. Skills will be developed in a laboratory program which enhances topics under consideration. The program is designed for students who have had no previous chemistry course.
Credits: 4
Students do lab work in this section – DO NOT sign up for separate lab section.

CINE-105 - Film Appreciation: Motion Picture/Art

The student will view a wide range of short and feature length films and be able to identify the major film theories, the basic techniques of filmmaking and the basic characteristics of the film medium as art and entertainment.
Credits: 3

COMM-102 - Communication Media

Students will examine the historical, technological, economic, organizational and social aspects of communication mediated by technology. The course will emphasize the convergence of conventional mass media with new forms of information services and provide knowledge, skills and perspectives to help prepare students to thrive as consumers and employees in the rapidly changing information society

Credits: 3

COMP-129 - (IT) Information Technology

This course is a rigorous introduction to computer science and computer applications. This course emphasizes common computer/technology skills and helps students access, process and present information. This course contains a component that helps the student to recognize analyze and assess ethical issues and situations in computer science.   Prerequisites: None, but READ-095 is recommended
Credits: 3

CRJU-101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

The social and institutional response to crime is discussed topically in this interdisciplinary survey of the American Criminal Justice System. Students are required to formulate views on controversial issues and concerns such as plea bargaining, the exclusionary rule, the insanity defense and the death penalty. This course is a prerequisite for all 200 level courses in the Criminal Justice program.
Credits: 3

CRJU 125 - Police Role in Community

The student will use various methods to analyze the police role in the United States. Research and experimentation on police, conducted in the past twenty years, is reviewed and discussed. Innovations in policing from Team Policing to Community Policing are also described and analyzed.

Credits: 3

CRJU 151 - Intro to Criminology

Students will be introduced to the study of crime and criminal behavior. This is the only course in the program which studies the criminal rather than society’s response to crime. Three different methods of measuring crime will be described; the five schools of criminological theory will be reviewed; and several different crime problems in America will be discussed.

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
Course content will be accessed over the Internet. Students will be contacted by postal mail with log-in and orientation information. Some courses require (in person) proctored testing. For more information, call the Distance Education Office at 732-224-2089 or visit our website at www.brookdalecc.edu.

Credits: 3

ECON-105 - Macro Economics

Students will understand how a market economy operates using the fundamental principles of supply and demand. They will be able to relate the significance of unemployment, inflation, and other indicators to our nation`s economy. They will be able to explain the effects of monetary and fiscal policy and the impact of foreign trade on the phenomenon of economic growth.  Prerequisites: MATH 015, READ 092, or READ 095 and ENGL 095 or passing scores in computation, reading, and English on the Basic Skills Test
Credits: 3

ECON-106 - Micro Economics

Students will understand principles of supply and demand including sensitivity analysis to price, income and utility.  They will analyze cost under various market structures.  Both the output and input markets will be examined.  Prerequisites: MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation, READ 092 or READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading, and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing.
Credits: 3

ECON-107 - Economics

This intensive course for non-business students combines macro and micro economics theory. It is designed to acquaint students with the nature of the market system and the major issues and problems affecting our economy. Students will understand the basic theoretical principles of demand theory, cost and price, equilibrium analysis and application to decision-making in the firm. Students will also understand the basic theoretical principles of production possibilities, national income accounts, consumption, investment, monetary and fiscal policies and problems of employment and price levels. ECON 107 is a condensed combination of ECON 105 and ECON 106. Therefore, a student will not receive credit for ECON 107 in addition to ECON 105 and ECON 106. Also, since ECON 107 is not a comprehensive combination of ECON 105 and ECON 106, it cannot be used in place of the two. (Prerequisites: MATH-012 or MATH-015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in computation, READ-092 or READ-095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in reading, and ENGL-095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in writing)

Credits: 3

ECON-225 - Business Statistics

Students will summarize statistical data, both graphically and as measures of center and dispersion. Discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling techniques, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression analysis, time series analysis, and index numbers are also covered. Lessons are presented as PowerPoint slides with the instructor’s voice. Self-tests, assignments, and exam reviews are also included in this online course.   Prerequisite: MATH 021, MATH 025 or a passing score in algebra on the Basic Skills Test.
BCC Equivalent: ECON 225 – Business Statistics
Credits: 3

ENGI-206 - Material Properties Processes

Students will be introduced to the basic principles underlying the behavior of materials. This course will provide the scientific foundation for an understanding of the relations between material properties, structure and performance for the classes of engineering solids (metals, polymers, ceramics, semiconductors and composites. Concepts will be developed and applied which allow for correlation between performance and aspects of structure, from the atomic through the macroscopic level, including ideas relating to atomic and larger size defects. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. (Prerequisite: CHEM-102)

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
Course content will be accessed over the Internet. Students will be contacted by postal mail with log-in and orientation information. Some courses require (in person) proctored testing. For more information, call the Distance Education Office at 732-224-2089 or visit our website at www.brookdalecc.edu.

Credits: 3

ENGL-121 - English Composition: The Writing Process

English 121 is an introductory writing course where students compose and revise narrative and expository essays and prepare for the study of literature by using writing to analyze texts.  Through a writers’ workshop approach, students explore the writing process, respond to a variety of texts and learn to communicate their ideas effectively and confidently in writing.  Prerequisite:  A grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 095, ENGL 097 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing
Credits: 3

ENGL-122 - English Composition: Writing & Research

This course teaches techniques and strategies for conducting research and for writing effectively on a range of subjects.  Students learn to write and revise convincing papers using critical thinking skills and information they find to support an assertion or position.  Related reasoning and support for papers necessitates inquiry into social ethics and moral situations.  Students learn to analyze and process this information using foundational principles of logic, ethical reasoning, and social morals.  Students also learn and demonstrate proper documentations style.  Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 121
Credits: 3

ENGL-155 - The Short Story

Students will read and discuss short stories drawn from the literature of many cultures and countries.  They will analyze the stories for the theme, form, relationship to their own lives and reflection of various cultures.  The relevance of these short stories for the modern reader will be examined.  Students must have a high-speed Internet connection to view companion course video programs
Credits: 3
Course Stream Video Available.

ENGL-158 - Introduction to Literature

This course is a fundamental overview of literature for those who love to read and for those who have previously been intimidated by literature courses. It teaches terminology of the four major genres of literature, (poetry, drama, short story and the novel) and the literary movements that have shaped these genres from the Classicism of Aristotle to the Anti- realism of MTV. This course stresses easy techniques for effectively answering essay questions, for writing papers for literature courses and for more efficient studying.
Credits: 3

ENGL-170 - Introduction to Social Media

This course teaches strategies and techniques for the utilization of social media applications for the purpose of creating a personal or professional web presence for a person or brand.
Credits: 3

ENGL-235 - World Literature I

The student will read and respond to masterpieces of world literature from the earliest times to the 18th century.  The works’ relevance for contemporary readers will be examined.  This broad based exploration of the ancient world, as seen through its literary art, exposes students to a wide variety of cultures, histories and regions.  Those regions include works from Africa, the Middle East, China, Japan, India, Central Asia, The Americas and Europe.  Prerequisite:  ENGL 095, ENGL 097 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading.
Credits: 3

ENGL-245 - American Literature I

This survey of Early American literature from the Puritans to Walt Whitman covers such writers as Ann Bradstreet, Ben Franklin, Jonathan Edwards, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Emerson and others. Emphasis is placed on literary movements like Transcendentalism, as well as on how American literature reflects American culture.
Credits: 3
Course Stream Video Available.

ENGL-266 - Young Adult Literature

The student will explore the domain of young adult literature by reading a sampling from various genres published for readers ages twelve and up. Students will apply principles of criticism in written and oral discussion.

Credits: 3

ENVR-107 - Environmental Science

Credits: 3

ENVR-108 - Principles of Sustainability

Sustainability involves meeting basic human needs without undermining human communities, culture, or natural environments. This difficult goal requires recognition of the complex interrelationships among environmental, economic, and social forces and reexamination of our relationships to technology, natural resources, natural science, human development and/or local to global politics. Students will be introduced to a variety of topics including climate change and environmental pollution, economic globalization, north-south disparity, local and global strategies, agriculture and sustainable food production, environmental ethics and history, and social justice. The course facilitates deeper student exploration of complex interrelationships among contemporary environmental, social, and economic problems and the solutions to overcome them. In addition, it will help students articulate personal philosophies to guide more sustainable lifestyles (i.e. choices for resource use and other behaviors)(Prerequisites: MATH-021 or MATH-025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in algebra, and READ-092 or READ-095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in reading
Credits: 3

GEOG-115 - Human Geography

Students will study the physical global environment focusing on the interaction of resources and cultural variables such as population patterns, language, religion, social customs, economic and political development.

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
This course was formerly called HGEO 105

Credits: 3

HESC-105 - Medical Terminology

Through a study of medical language, the student will be able to build a practical, working medical vocabulary. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the significance of Greek and Latin prefixes, suffixes and verbal roots as they pertain to the human body.
Credits: 3

HESC-115 - Nutrition and Health

Students are introduced to the basic concepts of nutrition. Emphasis will be placed on practical information that will enable students to make judgments about their food intake and gain awareness of the critical role of nutrition in health care. Concepts from biology, chemistry and physiology are used as a basis for the exploration of the role of nutrition in health.
Credits: 3

HESC-165 - Pathophysiology

This course covers the structural and functional changes associated with various disease conditions. There is an emphasis on clinical manifestations and treatment. In addition the student will understand how disease affects the body as a whole.
Credits: 3

HIST-105 - World Civilization I

The course will provide a general understanding of the chief characteristics of human history up to 1500, as exemplified by the traditional cultures of Africa, the Middle East, China, Japan, India, Central Asia, the Americas and Europe. Emphasis will be placed on the institutions, values and interrelationships among people across the globe, and the achievements and contributions of individual civilizations to human history.
Credits: 3

HIST-106 - World Civilization II

The course will examine the major developments in human history from 1500 to present. It will focus on the elements involved in Europe`s self-transformation into a modern society as seen in its intellectual, industrial and imperialist movements, and the world wars. Emphasis will also be placed on the history of Asian, African, Middle Eastern and Latin American societies and the impact of imperialism of those cultures; their reactions to, interaction with, and finally independence from Western dominance in the 20th century will also be explored.
Credits: 3
Course Stream Video Available

HIST-107 - Contemporary World History

This course is designed to provide students with the framework of the contemporary world which will be discussed by examining key historical developments since 1945, including the Cold War and the fall of communism, as well as the independence movements and revolutions in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East. Relying on a variety of historical readings and current accounts, emphasis will be placed on understanding the historical readings and contemporary issues such as international conflict, the environment, human and natural resources and global cultural and economic trends.
Credits: 3

HIST-125 - Women's History Survey: Experiences, Contributions and Debates

A survey of the experiences, lives and contribution of women to American history. The student will study women’s changing roles through history, as well as the diversity of women’s experience on a racial, ethnic and class basis. Problems and solutions women have faced in the past will be discussed with an emphasis on understanding the participation of women in America, to uncover and restore women’s achievements and experiences.
Credits: 3

HIST-135 - American Civilization I

Students will identify and discuss problems, events and personalities in American history which have influenced the origins and growth of the Republic from the colonial period until the Civil War (1861).  History will be viewed from many perspectives.
Credits:  3

HIST-136 - American Civilization II

Students will demonstrate an understanding of personalities, events and problems in American history from the Civil War (1865) until World War II (1941).
Credits: 3

HIST-137 - Recent American History

The student will recognize and assess the major forces that have shaped the course of American domestic and foreign policies since World War II ( 1945). The student will analyze the inter- relationship and consequences of foreign and domestic events.
Credits:  3

HIST-202 - History of New Jersey

This survey of New Jersey history will cover the development of New Jersey from the Native American inhabitants, the Leni Lenape, European colonization, the colonial period, the American Revolution, the Jacksonian Era, Slavery and the Civil War, the Industrial Revolution, Labor Union Movements, Immigration, Women’s Suffrage, Race issues and relations, the Great Depression, World War II, as well as the rise of Victorian Leisure, tourism and motion pictures. There will be special emphasis on Ecological history, Women’s history, architecture and African American history in all topics. The course will use New Jersey history as a means of understanding the major themes of United States history. Therefore, the themes of United States history, such as European Colonization, the American Revolution, Slavery, Industrialization, etc. are employed and amplified by local history. This approach will also give students a greater sense of place as New Jersey residents and will provide Education majors with a pedagogical foundation for teaching the subject. The course will include a class trip to a historical site. (Prerequisites: READ-092 or READ-095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in reading, and ENGL-095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in writing)|

Credits:  3

HIST-235 - Immigration & Ethnicity Hist

Students will demonstrate an understanding of the historical experiences of immigrants before, during and after arrival in this country, including ethnic life in the United States today.

Credits:  3

HITC-122 - Health Info in Alt Sys

In this course, the student is introduced to the use and function of the health record in non-acute care settings. Alternative sites include long term care, psychiatric settings, rehabilitation services and cancer programs. In addition, regulatory and accreditation standards will be discussed.(Prerequisite or Corequisite: HITC-121)

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
Course content will be accessed over the Internet. Students will be contacted by postal mail with log-in and orientation information. Some courses require (in person) proctored testing. For more information, call the Distance Education Office at 732-224-2089 or visit our website at www.brookdalecc.edu.

Credits: 4

HITC-123 - Health Information and the Law

This course focuses on the legal and ethical aspects of health information technology in the United States. The roles of various health care providers and governmental agencies are covered as well as health care legislation. There is an emphasis on the function of the medical record department in relation to risk management.
Credits: 3

HITC-222 - HIT Systems and Technology

This course introduces the student to computer applications in health information services. Data entry, display, abstracting and retrieval will be emphasized. The electronic record and future directions in information systems will also be discussed.(Prerequisite: HITC-121)
Credits: 3

HITC-224 - Coding and Classifications Systems

In this course the student will study the principles  of coding and classification systems with an emphasis on the Health Care Financing Administration’s Common Procedural Coding System (HCPCS) and Current Procedural Coding (CPT).
Credits: 4

HITC-225 - Health Information Management

This course addresses basic principles of supervision and management in the health information setting. Resources, procedures, planning, consultation and the role of the health information technician in the health care team will be discussed.(Prerequisite(s): HITC-121, HITC-122, HITC-123 HITC-221, HITC-222, and HITC-223)

Credits: 4

HITC-227 - Reimbursement Methodologies

This course provides students the opportunity to learn the history, rationale, and methodology of the systems used by third party payers to determine the reimbursement that health care providers will receive. Reimbursement concepts include fee-for-service, managed care, capitation systems, Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRGs), Resource Based Value Scale (RBRVS), Ambulatory Payment Classifications (APCs), and related concepts. The use of the charge description master (chargemaster) in reimbursement will be discussed. The importance of compliance with regulations and the related issues of fraud and abuse will also be addressed. (Prerequisite: HITC-221 and HITC-222; Prerequisite or Corequisite: HITC-224)
Credits: 3

HUMN-129 - Issues in Women's Studies

This course provides an exploration of the field of women’s studies and includes an analysis of women’s lives through readings in a wide range of topics from the new scholarship on gender. Students will be requested to write response papers as well as to read from a variety of texts. Research writing will also be included. Guest speakers will contribute a variety of perspectives from different areas of women’s experiences.
Credits: 3

MATH-131 - Statistics

This course begins with descriptive statistics, including graphical representations of data and measures of central tendency, position and variation.  Basic probability concepts lead to the study of the binomial and normal probability distributions.  The course continues with the Central Limit theorem and its use in the development of estimation through confidence intervals and hypothesis testing.  The course concludes with Chi Square tests and linear correlation and regression.  Computer software will be used in class to gain a greater understanding of underlying concepts.  Prerequisite:  MATH 021 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra.
Credits:  4

MATH-136 - Mathematics for the Liberal Arts

This is a mathematics survey course that covers sets, logic and two topics chosen from probability, numeration systems, geometry, consumer mathematics, and graph theory.  Prerequisite: MATH 021 or MATH 025, or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra.
Credits: 3

MATH-145 - Algebraic Modeling

This course is an intermediate algebra course in which examples are drawn from real life and skills are learned in the context of these applications. Topics include functions and their properties and associated algebraic skills, and modeling using linear, exponential, logarithmic, quadratic, rational, and radical functions. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic. A graphing calculator is required – the specific model is determined by the department. The course may be used as a prerequisite for MATH-146 and MATH-156 but NOT MATH-152 or MATH-153. (Prerequisites: MATH-021 or MATH-022 or MATH-025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in algebra)
Credits: 3

MRKT-101 - Introduction to Marketing

The student will master the fundamentals of marketing and marketing theory. The students will study theories relevant to marketing and the business environment, marketing and the social environment, research, product strategies and development, distribution, promotion and pricing. Prerequisite: READ 092, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading
Credits: 3

MRKT-111 - Fundamentals of Retailing

This course will involve the student in the study of basic retail operations and store management, including consumer behavior, location and site analysis, merchandising practices and policies, retail advertising, layout and display as well as other basic retail management responsibilities. (Prerequisites: READ-095 or satisfacory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in reading and MATH-015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in computation)

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
Course content will be accessed over the Internet. Students will be contacted by postal mail with log-in and orientation information. Some courses require (in person) proctored testing. For more information, call the Distance Education Office at 732-224-2089 or visit our website at www.brookdalecc.edu.

Credits: 3

MRKT-115 - Social Media Marketing

This course will explain, define, illustrate and apply the ways in which businesses can maximize their marketing efforts through the integration of social media with current marketing strategies.
Credits:  3

MUSI-101 - Fundamentals of Music

This course is designed for beginner music students or those wishing to review music notation. The student will learn to read simple music, identify the fundamentals of musical acoustics and define the fundamental rules of music theory. Attendance at an on-campus concert will be required.

Credits: 3

CONCERT ATTENDANCE IS REQUIRED.
CD Set: McGraw Hill: “ Music”

MUSI-115 - Music Appreciation

This course is designed for music listeners with experiences that will include classroom-teacher guided sessions, instructional cassettes, sound filmstrips, TV and radio broadcasts as well as attendance at operas, operettas, concerts and recitals.  The student will learn to understand and enjoy more fully the classics of music literature.  MUSI 115 OL is an on-line interactive course in music appreciation. Students who register for the course will purchase a CD set in the bookstore. It will enable students to register and access the course from an Internet site. All course work (with the exception of concert attendance) can be accessed from any PC with Internet access. The instructor will evaluate all course materials via the Internet and e-mail. Concert attendance (3 concerts) is a mandatory requirement. All concerts will be on the Brookdale main campus or in the immediate vicinity.
Credits: 3

CONCERT ATTENDANCE IS REQUIRED.
CD Set: McGraw Hill: “ Music”

MUSI-116 - History Of Jazz

The legacy of Jazz is uniquely indigenous to the American experience, in that it combines the musical traditions of the three distinct ethnic groups: the Western European tradition, African music and the newly emerging American tradition of the late 19th century. The History of Jazz will concentrate on Jazz music from its origins to present day developments. The musical style traits of different periods will be discussed from a non-technical point of view, making the material understandable to non-musicians. Historical and sociological factors will also be considered. The objectives will be accomplished through class discussion, selected listening, required concerts, and film viewings. Attendance at three concerts is mandatory.
Credits: 3

Concert Attendance is Required

NETW-236 - Computer Forensics & Investigation

This course provides a hands-on understanding of the methods, technologies, and challenges relevant to properly conducting a computer forensics investigation and response. Areas of study include procedures for investigating computer and cybercrime, and concepts for collecting, analyzing, recovering, and preserving forensic evidence. The course also covers working with various operating systems, including Windows, DOS, Macintosh, and Linux. Other topics covered include boot processes, disk structures, data acquisition, recovering image files, network forensics, being an expert witness, and reporting investigation results. This course requires three hours of lecture and additional independent lab time as necessary per week. (Prerequisites: NETW-106, NETW-107, and NETW-110 (or two of the three and department permission)

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
Course content will be accessed over the Internet. Students will be contacted by postal mail with log-in and orientation information. Some courses require (in person) proctored testing. For more information, call the Distance Education Office at 732-224-2089 or visit our website at www.brookdalecc.edu.

Credits: 3

NETW-237 - Perimeter Security

This course provides students with the theory and skills needed to secure networks using virtual private networks (VPNs) and firewalls. Various network security-related issues, including risks, threats, and vulnerabilities are introduced and examined. The focus is on best practices and strategies for network security and incident response. Different types of VPNs for securing data in an organization are discussed as well as the benefits and architecture of a VPN and how to implement a VPN. Other topics include the utility and the limitations of a firewall. Instruction is also given on the functionality of a firewall, how to construct, configure, and administer a firewall, secure network design, and layered network security strategies. This course requires three hours of lecture and additional independent time as necessary to complete course projects and assignments. (Prerequisites: NETW-106, NETW-107, and NETW-110 [or two of the three and department permission])

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
Course content will be accessed over the Internet. Students will be contacted by postal mail with log-in and orientation information. Some courses require (in person) proctored testing. For more information, call the Distance Education Office at 732-224-2089 or visit our website at www.brookdalecc.edu.

(At this time, not all course syllabi are available online. If your course syllabus is not available you may obtain one by contacting the discipline’s institute office.)\

Credits: 3

NURS-111 - Professional Roles I

Professional roles I introduces the student to the nursing profession and the role and responsibilities of the associate degree student and graduate in contemporary health care systems based practice. Building upon legal and ethical principles, regulatory guidelines and professional standards, nursing leadership at the bedside is developed utilizing critical thinking and clinical reasoning and decision making. Basic concepts of time management, prioritization of patient care, information literacy, and information technology and teamwork and collaboration are included in the course (Prerequisites: HESC-107, BIOL-111 [with a grade of ‘C’ or better); ENGL-121 and PSYC-106)

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
Course content will be accessed over the Internet. Students will be contacted by postal mail with log-in and orientation information. Some courses require (in person) proctored testing. For more information, call the Distance Education Office at 732-224-2089 or visit our website at www.brookdalecc.edu.

Credits: 1

NURS-112 - Professional Roles II

Professional roles II builds upon professional roles I to include professional nursing roles in patient advocacy and referrals; teaching and learning; collegial communication, interdisciplinary collaboration and conflict resolution; and provisions of continuity of care, including the uses of standardized communication and information technology systems in practice settings. (Prerequisites: NURS-111, NURS-125, and NURS-171 [grade of “C” or better])

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
Course content will be accessed over the Internet. Students will be contacted by postal mail with log-in and orientation information. Some courses require (in person) proctored testing. For more information, call the Distance Education Office at 732-224-2089 or visit our website at www.brookdalecc.edu.

(At this time, not all course syllabi are available online. If your course syllabus is not available you may obtain one by contacting the discipline’s institute office.)

Credits: 1

NURS-163 - Nursing and Human Needs in the Community

This course examines human needs in the community. The influence of the family, cultural diversity and financial concerns on the delivery of community-based care is explored. In addition, the varied roles and practice settings of the community-based nurse and the basic principles of epidemiology are discussed. (Prerequisite: Admission to the Nursing program).
Credits: 2

NURS-165 - Issues in Nursing

This course introduces students to current issues in nursing and health care. A range of topics is explored from philosophical, theoretical, ethical, social, economic, historical and research perspectives. A critical thinking approach that incorporates the elements of reasoning and universal intellectual standards focuses the student on generating new thoughts, understandings, beliefs and insights.
Credits: 2

NURS-171 - Nursing Concepts I

This course introduces students to nursing concepts, knowledge, skills and attitudes that will be developed throughout the program. The student will learn the role of the nurse in providing patient-centered care and develop clinical reasoning and decision-making skills as a foundation for the nursing process. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course. (Prerequisite: HESC-107 and BIOL-111 [grade of C or better]; PSYC-106 and ENGL-121. Prerequisite or corequisite: NURS-111 and NURS-125)

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
Additional weekly lab hours are required. Students will be required to register for a clinical lab section.

Credits: 6

NURS-172 - Nursing Concepts II

This course develops the nursing knowledge, skills and attitudes of the student in providing patient centered care to adults with common problems of homeostasis related to concepts of oxygenation, perfusion, metabolism elimination and cognition and memory. The student will also learn to provide nursing care for adults with adaptive and maladaptive psychosocial behaviors. Communication, the nursing process, clinical reasoning and clinical decision-making continue to be emphasized (Prerequisites: NURS-111, NURS-125, and NURS 171 (grade of C or better); BIOL-112; Prerequisite or Corequisites: NURS-112)

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
This is an on-line course. Course content will be accessed over the internet. Students will be contacted by postal mail for log-in and orientation information. This course requires in-person proctored testing on campus. Additional weekly lab hours are required. Students are required to register for a clinical lab section.

(At this time, not all course syllabi are available online. If your course syllabus is not available you may obtain one by contacting the discipline’s institute office.)

Credits: 6

NURS-261 - Nursing and Human Needs III

In Nursing III, the student uses the Human Needs Framework to care for individuals with alterations in mental health, oxygenation, tissue perfusion and metabolism.  Prerequisites:  NURS 162 and BIOL 213

NURS-262 - Nursing and Human Needs IV

In Nursing 262, students use the Human Needs Framework to care for clients with alterations in nutrition, absoption, elimination, sensation and perception. (Prerequisite: NURS 261)
Credits: 3

NURS-263 - Managing and Coordinating Nursing Care

In Managing and Coordinating Nursing Care, students use the Human Needs Framework to integrate nursing management concepts and principles in planning the care of groups of clients in the acute care setting. Prerequisite:  NURS 262 NOTE: NURSING 263 students will need to flex their clinical hours to follow the preceptor’s schedule and will vary on a weekly basis.
Student will be required to attend an in class orientation and have in person proctored testing on the Lincroft Campus. See Master Schedule for clinical sections.
Credits:  3

PBHL-205 - Issues in Disaster Management

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the role of the public health system in disaster preparedness and response to an all-hazards event. It will examine the potential public health consequences of disasters as well as preparedness strategies, emergency planning and the importance of a multi-disciplinary response approach.(Prerequisites: PBHL-105)

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
Course content will be accessed over the Internet. Students will be contacted by postal mail with log-in and orientation information. Some courses require (in person) proctored testing. For more information, call the Distance Education Office at 732-224-2089 or visit our website at www.brookdalecc.edu.

(At this time, not all course syllabi are available online. If your course syllabus is not available you may obtain one by contacting the discipline’s institute office.)

Credits: 3

PHIL-105 - Practical Reasoning

The focus of this course is the development of students analytical skills. Students will evaluate claims, distinguish arguments from explanations, identify examples of pseudo-reasoning and use inductive generalizations. Problem-solving will be the primary mode of learning. (Prerequisite: READ 092, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading.)
Credits: 3

PHIL-115 - Introduction to Philosophy

Students investigate key issues in philosophy, including the nature of self, knowledge and truth, freedom and determinism, morality, the nature of the universe, the existence of God, death and afterlife, meaning and purpose. Emphasis will be given to clarifying students’ own thinking on these issues through reading, reflection and discussion. Prerequisite: READ 092, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading.
Credits: 3

PHIL-227 - Introduction to Ethics

Students will become familiar with many approaches to deciding what is “right” and “wrong” in human behavior. This course begins with a look at several ethics theories, each intending to provide a framework for moral decision-making. The second part of the course involves discussion of many controversial issues such as the taking of human life, sexual behavior, abortion, business, medical practice, etc. (Certain sections of the course will be designated to focus on questions within one particular area, e.g., Business Ethics, Nursing Ethics, Environmental Ethics. See the Master Schedule for designated topics). Prerequisite: READ 092, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading.
Credits: 3

POLI-101 - Introduction to Political Science

As an introductory course in Political Science, students examine basics concepts of democracy and dictatorship, the nation-state, law, ideology, interest groups and political parties. Course activities include use of teacher and guest lectures, small group discussion, student presentations and video offerings.
Credits:  3

POLI-105 - American National Government

Students in American National Government study the structure and philosophy of the United States government, including themes of national economy, energy, environment, health, education, welfare, civil rights, civil liberties, foreign policy and political parties. Course activities include the use of teacher and guest lectures, small group discussion, student presentations and video offerings.
Credits: 3

POLI-115 - State, County and Local Government

The student will study the structure and philosophy of state, county and local governments within the United States – though particular attention is given to these themes as they apply in New Jersey. Topics include the economy, energy, environment, health, education, welfare, law enforcement, political parties, civil rights and civil liberties. Course activities include the use of teacher and guest lectures, small group discussion, student presentations and video offerings.
Credits: 3

PSYC-105 - Introduction to Psychology I

Students will demonstrate an understanding of psychology as a science. They will complete exercises covering fundamental areas of discipline: history of psychology, scientific method, sensation and perception, learning and memory, IQ and personality testing. Students will gain the ability to examine these subjects from a critical as well as diverse point of view; the roles of gender, cultural and individual differences are systematically explored. Service-learning is an option.
Credits: 3

PSYC-106 - Introduction to Psychology II

Students will demonstrate an understanding of Psychology as an applied science.  They will complete exercises covering the relevant areas:  social and interpersonal behavior, motivation, emotion, psychological disorders, personality theories and the psychotherapies.  Students will gain the ability to analyze a variety of theoretical perspectives from critical and diverse points of view while applying them to problems of daily living.  Service-learning is an option.
Credits:  3

PSYC-127 - Eval & Diagnosis Addict Client

This course is designed to provide students with the fundamental skills needed for evaluating clients who may or may not have substance abuse as a primary referral issue. Students will explore the basic issues, concepts, and trends in addiction as they relate to proper assessment and documentation for individuals suffering from addictions (especially addictions to drugs, alcohol, and/or gambling.) NOTE: Thsi course is offered only in the Spring term. (Prerequisite: PSYC-125)

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
Course content will be accessed over the Internet. Students will be contacted by postal mail with log-in and orientation information. Some courses require (in person) proctored testing. For more information, call the Distance Education Office at 732-224-2089 or visit our website at www.brookdalecc.edu.

(At this time, not all course syllabi are available online. If your course syllabus is not available you may obtain one by contacting the discipline’s institute office.)

Credits: 3

PSYC-206 - Human Growth & Development I

The student will demonstrate an understanding of development from birth through adolescence.  Emphasis will be placed on different theoretical views of development and reactions to them.  The student will validate important concepts with theories, laboratory experience and research findings. Prerequisite: PSYC 105 or 106.
Credits: 3

PSYC-208 - Life Span Development

Credits: 3

PSYC-216 - Abnormal Psychology

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the descriptions, natural history and psychodynamics of various types of abnormal behavior in order to function effectively as a member of a treatment team. Students are required to spend 10 hours in field work to practice observation skills.  Prerequisites:  PSYC 105 or PSYC 106; PSYC111 required for Human Services Program majors.
Credits: 3

PSYC-218 - Educational Psychology

This course is designed to assist students with the application of psychological principles to classrooms at all educational levels. Topics include: cognitive development, learning theories, motivation, multicultural issues and student assessments. Course activities include the use of instructor and guest lectures, small group discussion, and student presentations.
Credits: 3

PSYC-247 - Quantitative Methods in Psych

Quantitative methods used in psychological research: descriptive and inferential statistics. In this course, methods are situated within the design and interpretation of experimental data. Includes such methods as z-tests, correlation and regression, t-tests (single sample, dependent and independent means), and ANOVA (single and two-factor) and their application with statistical software. (Prerequisite(s): MATH-021 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in algebra and at lease a grade of “C” or better in PSYC-105 or PSYC-106)
Credits: 4

RADT-255 - Radiographic Pathology

This course covers terminology, etiology and disease processes of various pathological disorders, especially as it pertains to radiographic imaging. Systemic classification of diseases and radiographic findings are also discussed, emphasizing the relationship between imaging modalities and the diagnosis of disease. (Prerequisite: RADT-250, RADT-251 and RADT-252; Corequisite: RADT-256 and RADT-257)

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
This is an on-line course. Course content will be accessed over the internet. Students will be contacted by postal mail with log-in and orientation information. This course requires in person orientation and proctored testing on campus. For more information, call the Distance Education Office at 732-224-2089 or visit our website at www.brookdalecc.edu

(At this time, not all course syllabi are available online. If your course syllabus is not available you may obtain one by contacting the discipline’s institute office.)

Credits: 2

RADT-256 - Issues in Health Care

This course covers advanced professional principles of radiologic technology and health care from theoretical, ethical, social and economic perspectives. A wide range of topics are explored including scope of practice, professional standards, advanced professional practice, ethical accountability, legal responsibility, research, health care delivery and cultural diversity as it pertains to health care professionals. (Prerequisite: RADT-250, RADT-251 and RADT-252; Corequisites: RADT-255 and RADT-257)

(At this time, not all course syllabi are available online. If your course syllabus is not available you may obtain one by contacting the discipline’s institute office.)

Credits: 2

SOCI-101 - Principles of Sociology

Sociology is a new look at the familiar world of everyday life. In this introductory course students will use the sociological perspective to analyze and understand their relationships to the various groups and social categories that constitute modern society. They will investigate the major concepts of deviance, social class and inequity, as well family-related issues including those of gender and aging. (Prerequisite: READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirements in reading)
Credits:  3

SOCI-105 - Intercultural Communication: The Person and the Process

Students will develop a personal and theoretical understanding of the cultural origin of various people’s values, ideologies, habits and idiosyncrasies, and how they effect communication across cultural, racial, ethnic and gender lines. Through observing, simulating and experiencing incidents of cross-cultural communication, they will begin to examine and develop skills that are necessary for effective understanding and for successful intercultural communication among majority and minority groups.
Credits: 3

SOCI-215 - Marriage and the Family

Students develop a sociological understanding of marriage and the family as a social institution. Emphasis will be placed on the structure and relationships of the contemporary family, as well as the problem areas encountered and the ways in which our society deals with these problems. (Prerequisites: READ-095 or or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in reading; SOCI-101 strongly recommended)
Credits: 3

SOCI-225 - Sociology of Gender

This course is an introduction to the sociology of gender. It will explore the social construction of gender in a global and historical perspective and the ways in which gender as a system and intersecting with race and class creates and enforces inequality. (Prerequisites: Any 100 level Sociology course or ENGL-175, ENGL-229, HIST-125, HUMN-129, HUMN-230 or PSYC-225)

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
Course content will be accessed over the Internet. Students will be contacted by postal mail with log-in and orientation information. Some courses require (in person) proctored testing. For more information, call the Distance Education Office at 732-224-2089 or visit our website at www.brookdalecc.edu.

(At this time, not all course syllabi are available online. If your course syllabus is not available you may obtain one by contacting the discipline’s institute office.)

Credits: 3

SPAN-101 - Elementary Spanish Communication I

This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge, or very limited knowledge, of the Spanish language. Strong emphasis will be placed on acquiring conversational and comprehension skills, using practical and interesting situational materials that will stress both language and culture. Grammatical patterns and syntax will be introduced with the aim that students read and write what they have learned to say and understand. (This course is not open to native Spanish speakers or to students with more than two years of Spanish in high school, except by instructor approval)
Credits:  4

SPAN-102 - Elementary Spanish Communications II

Students will build upon skills acquired in the first semester course and will be able to express themselves in a variety of more complex situations in Spanish. Prerequisite: A “C” or higher in SPAN 101 or instructor approval
Credits:  4

SPCH-115 - Public Speaking

Students will develop the public speaking skills central to success in academic, civic, business and professional life.  Students who complete SPCH 115 will have performed informative, persuasive and demonstrative speeches which exhibit competence in academic research, technological literacy, ethical reasoning, critical thinking, organization and extemporaneous delivery.
Credits: 3
Course Stream Video Available

SPCH-130 - Interpersonal Communications

This course will introduce students to the study of interpersonal communication. Students will be provided with an opportunity to improve their theoretical understanding and practical application of interpersonal skills. Specific focus on dyadic communication relationships will include aspects of initiation, maintenance and closure within situation specific contexts. An oral skill building approach to this course and its material will require that students participate in class activities that emphasize effective listening and speaking. Additionally written assignments and/or tests accompany each unit. (Prerequisite: READ-095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in reading)

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
Course content will be accessed over the Internet. Students will be notified via postal mail with log-in and orientation information. Some courses require (in-person) proctored testing. For more information call the Distance Education office at 732-224-2089 or visit our website at www.brookdalecc.edu.

(At this time, not all course syllabi are available online. If your course syllabus is not available you may obtain one by contacting the discipline’s institute office.)

Credits: 3