MyBrookdale

Fall 2019 11-Week Online Courses

ACCT-101 - Principles of Accounting

An introduction to basic concepts and principles of recording and posting financial information, preparation of trial balance, worksheet, and financial statements. Current assets and liabilities are emphasized. Prerequisites are MATH 012, MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation; and READ 092, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading.
Credits: 3

ACCT-102 - Principles of Accounting II

This course is a continuation of ACCT 101. It introduces partnership and corporate accounting. Long-term assets and liabilities, cash flow and analysis of financial statements are emphasized. (Prerequisite: ACCT 101)

Credits: 3

ANTH-105 - Cultural Anthropology

The student will investigate the concepts of culture and apply them to different cultures of the world. The student will determine the universal aspects of each culture concept and investigate the development and consequences of culture’s evolution from simple to complex.
Credits:  3

BUSI-105 - Introduction To Business

In this survey course, the student will receive and an overview of functional areas of business and learn the basics concepts of the business world.  Some topics covered include management, managing human resources, labor relations, ethics, and social responsibility, accounting, money and banking, securities and investments, marketing and globalization.  Upon completion of this course, students will understand the various forms of business ownership and the free enterprise system and how it contrasts with other systems.  This course will assist the student in making career choices and will serve as an entry level foundation course.  Prerequisite: READ 092  or READ 095 or a passing score in reading on Basic Skills Test
Credits: 3

BUSI-205 - Principles of Management

The student will develop an insight into the basic concepts, functions and techniques of administrative management. The student will obtain specific knowledge of how to manage the planning, organizing, leading and controlling that is involved in any type of organization. Upon completion of the course, the student will have an understanding of the principles of good management.(Prerequisite: BUSI-105 or permission of instructor or HOSP-105 Introduction to Hospitality Management for Hospitality Management AS majors only)

Credits: 3

BUSI-221 - Business Law I

The student will identify, define and describe contracts, agency, employment, wills, bailment, personal and real property.

Credits: 3

CHEM-101 - General Chemistry I

The student will investigate the fundamental concepts of chemistry from a theoretical approach and participate in a laboratory program that demonstrates this theory. The subjects covered include atomic structure, chemical bonding, acids and bases, gases, solids and liquids and properties of solutions. The course content is designed for the science major who wishes to transfer to a four-year institution. (Prerequisites: HS Chemistry or a grade of “C” or higher in CHEM 100 or equivalent, and a grade of “C” or higher in MATH 151)
Credits: 5

CHEM-116 - Chemistry In Life

This chemistry course for non-science majors will focus on the role chemistry plays in maintaining and improving our quality of life. Topics include environmental issues such as air pollution, acid rain and recycling; the study of energy sources including nuclear power; and health issues such as nutrition and world hunger. The accompanying lab involves the study of common items found in everyday life.  Prerequisite: MATH 012 or MATH 015 or passing score in computation on Basic Skills Test
Credits: 4
Students do lab work in this section – DO NOT sign up for separate lab section.

CHEM-136 - Introduction to Inorganic, Organic, and Biological Chemistry

The student will consider selected concepts from inorganic, organic, and biological chemistry which will be applied to allied health and biological fields. Skills will be developed in a laboratory program which enhances topics under consideration. The program is designed for students who have had no previous chemistry course.
Credits: 4
Students do lab work in this section – DO NOT sign up for separate lab section.

COMP-129 - Information Technology

This course is a rigorous introduction to computer science and computer applications. This course emphasizes common computer/technology skills and helps students access, process and present information. This course contains a component that helps the student to recognize analyze and assess ethical issues and situations in computer science.   Prerequisites: None, but READ-095 is recommended
Credits: 3

CRJU-151 - Introduction to Criminology

Students will be introduced to the study of crime and criminal behavior.  This is the only course in the program which studies the criminal rather than society’s response to crime.  Three different methods of measuring crime will be described; the five schools of criminological theory will be reviewed; and several different crime problems in America will be discussed.
Credits: 3

ECON-105 - Macro Economics

Students will understand how a market economy operates using the fundamental principles of supply and demand. They will be able to relate the significance of unemployment, inflation and other indicators to our nation’s economy. They will be able to explain the effects of monetary and fiscal policy and the impact of foreign trade on the phenomenon of economic growth(Prerequisites: MATH-012 or MATH-015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in computation, READ-092 or READ-095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in reading, and ENGL-095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in writing)

Credits: 3

ECON-225 - Business Statistics

Students will summarize statistical data, both graphically and as measures of center and dispersion. Discrete and continuous probability, sampling techniques, distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, regression, time series analysis and index numbers are also covered. (Prerequisite: MATH-021, MATH-025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in algebra)

Credits: 3

ENGL-121 - English Composition: The Writing Process

English 121 is an introductory writing course where students compose and revise narrative and expository essays and prepare for the study of literature by using writing to analyze texts.  Through a writers’ workshop approach, students explore the writing process, respond to a variety of texts and learn to communicate their ideas effectively and confidently in writing.  Prerequisite:  A grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 095, ENGL 097 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing
Credits: 3

ENGL-122 - English Composition: Writing & Research

This course teaches techniques and strategies for conducting research and for writing effectively on a range of subjects.  Students learn to write and revise convincing papers using critical thinking skills and information they find to support an assertion or position.  Related reasoning and support for papers necessitates inquiry into social ethics and moral situations.  Students learn to analyze and process this information using foundational principles of logic, ethical reasoning, and social morals.  Students also learn and demonstrate proper documentations style.  Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 121
Credits: 3

ENGL-155 - The Short Story

Students will read and discuss short stories drawn from the literature of many cultures and countries. They will analyze the stories for the theme, form, relationship to their own lives and reflection of various cultures. The relevance of these short stories for the modern reader will be examined.

Credits: 3

GEOG-115 - Human Geography

Students will study the physical global environment focusing on the interaction of resources and cultural variables such as population patterns, language, religion, social customs, economic and political development.

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
This course was formerly called HGEO 105

Credits: 3

HESC-115 - Nutrition and Health

Students are introduced to the basic concepts of nutrition. Emphasis will be placed on practical information that will enable students to make judgments about their food intake and gain awareness of the critical role of nutrition in health care. Concepts from biology, chemistry and physiology are used as a basis for the exploration of the role of nutrition in health.

Credits: 3

HIST-105 - World Civilization I

The course will provide a general understanding of the chief characteristics of human history up to 1500, as exemplified by the traditional cultures of Africa, the Middle East, China, Japan, India, Central Asia, the Americas and Europe. Emphasis will be placed on the institutions, values and interrelationships among people across the globe, and the achievements and contributions of individual civilizations to human history.
Credits: 3

HIST-107 - Contemporary World History

This course is designed to provide students with the framework of the contemporary world which will be discussed by examining key historical developments since 1945, including the Cold War and the fall of communism, as well as the independence movements and revolutions in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East. Relying on a variety of historical readings and current accounts, emphasis will be placed on understanding the historical readings and contemporary issues such as international conflict, the environment, human and natural resources and global cultural and economic trends.
Credits: 3

HIST-135 - American Civilization I

Students will identify and discuss problems, events and personalities in American history which have influenced the origins and growth of the Republic from the colonial period until the Civil War (1861).  History will be viewed from many perspectives.
Credits:  3

HIST-136 - American Civilization II

Students will identify and discuss problems, events and personalities in American history which have influenced the origins and growth of the Republic from the colonial period until the Civil War (1861).  History will be viewed from many perspectives.
Credits:  3

MATH-131 - Statistics

This course begins with descriptive statistics, including graphical representations of data and measures of central tendency, position and variation.  Basic probability concepts lead to the study of the binomial and normal probability distributions.  The course continues with the Central Limit theorem and its use in the development of estimation through confidence intervals and hypothesis testing.  The course concludes with Chi Square tests and linear correlation and regression.  Computer software will be used in class to gain a greater understanding of underlying concepts.  Prerequisite:  MATH 021 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra.
Credits:  4

MATH-145 - Algebraic Modeling

This course is an intermediate algebra course in which examples are drawn from real life and skills are learned in the context of these applications. Topics include functions and their properties and associated algebraic skills, and modeling using linear, exponential, logarithmic, quadratic, rational, and radical functions. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic. A graphing calculator is required – the specific model is determined by the department. The course may be used as a prerequisite for MATH-146 and MATH-156 but NOT MATH-152 or MATH-153. (Prerequisites: MATH-021 or MATH-022 or MATH-025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in algebra)

Credits:  4

MRKT-101 - Intro. to Marketing

The student will master the fundamentals of marketing and marketing theory. The students will study theories relevant to marketing and the business environment, marketing and the social environment, research, product strategies and development, distribution, promotion and pricing. (Prerequisite: READ-092, READ-095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic foundational studies in reading)

IMPORTANT SECTION INFORMATION:
Course content will be accessed over the Internet. Students will be contacted by postal mail with log-in and orientation information. Some courses require (in person) proctored testing. For more information, call the Distance Education Office at 732-224-2089 or visit our website at www.brookdalecc.edu.

(At this time, not all course syllabi are available online. If your course syllabus is not available you may obtain one by contacting the discipline’s institute office.)

Credits: 3

NETW-106 - Intro to Networking TCP/IP

This course provides a hands-on understanding of the methods, technologies, and challenges relevant to properly conducting a computer forensics investigation and response. Areas of study include procedures for investigating computer and cybercrime, and concepts for collecting, analyzing, recovering, and preserving forensic evidence. The course also covers working with various operating systems, including Windows, DOS, Macintosh, and Linux. Other topics covered include boot processes, disk structures, data acquisition, recovering image files, network forensics, being an expert witness, and reporting investigation results. This course requires three hours of lecture and additional independent lab time as necessary per week. (Prerequisites: NETW-106, NETW-107, and NETW-110 (or two of the three and department permission)
Credits: 3

NETW-107 - Introduction to Security

This course provides a fundamental understanding of network security principles and implementation through lecture, hands-on activities, and case studies. Topics covered include: authentication, types of attacks, malicious code, email threats and countermeasures, Web applications, remote access, and file and print services, intrusion detection systems, firewalls, and physical security concepts, security policies, disaster recovery, and computer forensics. Security topologies are discussed as well as technologies used and principles involved in creating secure computer networking environments such as providing secure communications channels, secure internetworking devices, and network medium and the daily tasks involved with managing and troubleshooting these technologies. Hands-on and case project assignments will reinforce each of the concepts. This course is offered only in the Fall term.

Credits: 3

NETW-238 - Hacker Tech, Tools & Incident

This course provides students with the theory and skills required in the fields of ethical hacking and incident handling. Areas of instruction include various tools and techniques, vulnerabilities of operating systems, software and networks used by hackers to access unauthorized information, and techniques and technologies to defend against these attacks. This course also addresses incident handling methods used when information security is compromised. This course requires three hours of lecture and additional independent time as necessary to complete course projects and assignments. (Prerequisites: NETW-106, NETW-107, and NETW-110 [or two of the three and department permission])

Credits: 3

PHIL-227 - Introduction to Ethics

Students will become familiar with many approaches to deciding what is “right” and “wrong” in human behavior. This course begins with a look at several ethics theories, each intending to provide a framework for moral decision-making. The second part of the course involves discussion of many controversial issues such as the taking of human life, sexual behavior, abortion, business, medical practice, etc. (Certain sections of the course will be designated to focus on questions within one particular area, e.g., Business Ethics, Nursing Ethics, Environmental Ethics. See the Master Schedule for designated topics). Prerequisite: READ 092, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading.
Credits: 3

PSYC-106 - Introduction to Psychology II

Students will demonstrate an understanding of Psychology as an applied science.  They will complete exercises covering the relevant areas:  social and interpersonal behavior, motivation, emotion, psychological disorders, personality theories and the psychotherapies.  Students will gain the ability to analyze a variety of theoretical perspectives from critical and diverse points of view while applying them to problems of daily living.  Service-learning is an option.
Credits:  3

PSYC-208 - Life Span Development

This course in Life Span Human Development examines age changes in behavior from conception through the end life cycle. Milestones in physical, cognitive and social development are charted for each stage of the life cycle. We will see how each unique life structure is shaped by numerous internal and external influences. By integrating experimental research findings with theories and case studies, students will be able to refine their own developmental perspective. Principles of human development, theoretical perspectives and experimental research data will be measured against each student’s own experiences and personal observations. Prerequisite: PSYC 105 or PSYC 106
Credits: 3

SOCI-101 - Principles of Sociology

Sociology is a new look at the familiar world of everyday life. In this introductory course students will use the sociological perspective to analyze and understand their relationships to the various groups and social categories that constitute modern society. They will investigate the major concepts of deviance, social class and inequity, as well family-related issues including those of gender and aging. (Prerequisite: READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirements in reading)
Credits:  3

SPAN-101 - Elementary Spanish I

This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge, or very limited knowledge, of the Spanish language. Strong emphasis will be placed on acquiring conversational and comprehension skills, using practical and interesting situational materials that will stress both language and culture. Grammatical patterns and syntax will be introduced with the aim that students read and write what they have learned to say and understand. (This course is not open to native Spanish speakers or to students with more than two years of Spanish in high school, except by instructor approval)

Credits: 4

SPCH-115 - Public Speaking

Students will develop the public speaking skills central to success in academic, civic, business and professional life. Students who complete SPCH-115 will have performed informative, persuasive and demonstrative speeches which exhibit competence in academic research, technological literacy, ethical reasoning, critical thinking, organization and extemporaneous delivery. (Prerequisite(s): READ-092, READ-094, READ-095 or ESL-012 or satisfactory completion of the College’s foundational studies requirement in reading)

Credits: 4