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I. Title of Regulation

6.3500R Academic Integrity Code Regulation

II. Objective of Regulation

To inform faculty, staff, and students of the College community’s standards of academic integrity and the process for adjudicating alleged violations of those standards

III. Authority

Bylaws of the Board of Trustees, 1.3054(f)

IV. Regulation Statement

This regulation defines violations of academic integrity and outlines the potential penalties for such violations and the process for adjudicating alleged violations. This Academic Integrity Code applies to all academic units of Brookdale Community College

A. Definitions

Cheating – The use or possession of inappropriate or prohibited materials, information, sources, or aids in any academic exercise.  Cheating also includes submitting papers, research results or reports, analyses, and other textual or visual material and media as one’s own work when others prepared them.

Fabrication – The invention or falsification of sources, citations, data, or results, and recording or reporting them in any academic exercise.

Facilitation of Dishonesty – Deliberately or carelessly allowing one’s work to be used by other students without prior approval of the instructor or otherwise aiding others in committing violations of academic integrity.

Plagiarism – The use of previously self-submitted or another person’s words, ideas, images, data, or results, no matter the form or media, without giving that person appropriate credit.

Student – All persons taking courses at the College, full-time or part-time, without regard to the physical location of the course, including off-campus sites or through distance learning. Persons who have not officially applied to the College or are not enrolled for a particular term but have or have had a continuing relationship with the College are considered students.

Violations Involving Potentially Criminal Activity – Violations in this category include, but are not limited to, theft, fraud, forgery, or distribution of illicitly obtained materials committed as part of an act of academic dishonesty.

B. Principles of Academic Integrity

Academic Integrity

As an academic community dedicated to the values of educational excellence, economic empowerment, institutional integrity, and diversity, Brookdale Community College is committed to fostering an intellectual and ethical environment based on the principles of academic integrity. Academic integrity is essential to the success of the College’s educational, research, and clinical missions, and violations of academic integrity constitute serious offenses against the entire academic community.

The principles of academic integrity require that a student:

Adherence to these principles is necessary to ensure that:

 

Failure to uphold these principles of academic integrity threatens both the reputation of the College and the value of the degrees awarded to its students. Every member of the College community, therefore, bears a responsibility for ensuring that the highest standards of academic integrity are upheld.

To uphold these principles, the College administration is responsible for:

 

All members of the College share the collegial responsibility for educating students about the importance and principles of academic integrity. Faculty members are expected to inform students of the particular requirements regarding academic integrity within their specific courses, to make reasonable efforts to minimize academic dishonesty, and to respond appropriately to violations of academic integrity. Additionally, faculty members are strongly encouraged to provide a statement concerning academic integrity and a link to the Academic Integrity Policy and related Regulation on their course syllabi. Students are responsible for understanding the principles of academic integrity and abiding by them in all aspects of their work at the College. Students are also encouraged to help educate fellow students about academic integrity and to bring all alleged violations of academic integrity they encounter to the attention of the appropriate parties.

To create a strong culture that promotes academic integrity, instructors have the option to adopt an honor pledge similar to the one suggestion below to be written and signed on examinations and major course assignments submitted for grading: I affirm that I will not plagiarize, use unauthorized materials, or give or receive illegitimate help on assignments, papers, projects, presentations, or exams. Some specialized programs may have codes of professional conduct that impose additional requirements such as requiring students to report observed violations of academic integrity by others and to self-report such violations.


Applicability of the Regulation

This Academic Integrity Code Policy applies to all academic units of Brookdale Community College. Students are responsible for understanding and adhering to the requirements of this Regulation. While also being assured that they will be accorded fair and objective treatment when violations occur.


C. Academic Integrity Violations

Types of Violations

This section describes various ways in which the principles of academic integrity can be violated. Examples of each type of violation are provided in this Regulation Policy; however, neither the types of violations nor the lists of examples are exhaustive.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the use of previously self-submitted another person’s words, ideas, images, data, or results, no matter the form or media, without giving that person appropriate credit. To avoid plagiarism, a student must identify every direct quotation using quotation marks or appropriate indentation and cite both direct quotation and paraphrasing properly according to the accepted format for the particular discipline or as required by the instructor in a course. Some common examples of plagiarism are:

Cheating: Cheating is the use or possession of inappropriate or prohibited materials, information, sources, or aids in any academic exercise. Cheating also includes submitting papers, research results or reports, analyses, and other textual or visual material and media as one’s own work when others prepared them.  Some common examples are:

Fabrication: Fabrication is the invention of falsification of sources, citations, data, or results, and recording or reporting them in any academic exercise. Some examples include the following:

Facilitation of Dishonesty: Facilitation of dishonesty is deliberately or carelessly allowing one’s work to be used by other students without prior approval of the instructor of otherwise aiding others in committing violations of academic integrity. A student who deliberately facilitates a violation of academic integrity can be subject to the same sanctions as the student who receives the impermissible assistance, even if the facilitator does not benefit personally from the violation. Some examples are:

D. Levels of Violations

Violations of academic integrity are generally divided into three categories: Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3.

 

The procedures for adjudicating alleged violations of academic integrity are different for Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 violations. The following examples of violations are not exhaustive. Classification of a given violation is heavily dependent on the exact facts and circumstances of the violation as determined by the Chief Academic Officer.

Level 1 Violations

Level 1 violations are less serious violations of academic integrity. They may occur because of inexperience or lack of understanding of the principles of academic integrity and are often characterized by a relatively low degree of premeditation or planning on the part of the student committing the violation. These violations are generally quite limited in extent, occur on a minor assignment or quiz, or constitute a small portion of a major assignment and/or represent a small percentage of the total course work. Below are a few examples of violations that are considered Level 1, at least when committed by an undergraduate student as a first-time offense.

 

Level 2 Violations

Level 2 violations are serious violations of academic integrity that affect a more significant portion of the course work compared to Level 1 violations or are an alleged second violation of this regulation Level 2 violations are often characterized by substantial premeditation or planning and clearly dishonest or malicious intent on the part of the student committing the violation. Below are some examples of violations that are most often considered Level 2.

 

Level 3 Violations

Level 3 violations are serious breaches of conduct, may involve a serious violation of a professional code of conduct, may include dishonesty and maliciousness, violation of law, and/or are likely to cause direct harm to others. Below are some examples of violations that are considered Level 3.

 

When a student is accused of one or more Level 3 violations that include alleged violations of law or a professional code of conduct, or when it is reasonable to believe that the student is likely to cause direct harm to others, they may be removed from a course, clinical, or internship setting on an interim basis. The student shall be immediately informed in writing of any interim removal and has the right to appeal to the Chief Academic Officer.

E. Sanctions

Any violation of academic integrity is a serious offense subject to appropriate sanctions or penalties up to and including suspension from the College. Violations of academic integrity may result in academic penalties, educational sanctions, and/or disciplinary sanctions, and are not limited to the examples below.

Academic Sanctions

 

Educational Sanctions

 

Disciplinary Sanctions

Note: Any of these sanctions may have an impact on financial aid, scholarship, or scholastic standing.

 

F. Process and Discipline Procedures

The College ensures every individual has the right to a fair and equal process in academic disciplinary matters. The flowchart below outlines the process.

At the meeting of the Academic Integrity Appeal, the student and the faculty/staff member will have the right to produce witnesses on her/his behalf, to question all witnesses, and to bring the counsel of her/his own choosing. Representatives will be allowed to advise their respective parties but not speak at the hearing. Any other Brookdale students, faculty, and staff may attend only through invitation by the Chief Academic Officer. Within two weeks after the hearing, the student and faculty will be informed in writing of the Committee’s determination of academic code violation. If the committee finds that a violation of the academic code did occur, the outcome determined by the faculty will be upheld. If the committee finds in favor of the appeal, no sanctions will be imposed. All records of violations of the academic integrity code will be maintained by the Office of the Chief Academic Officer.

VI. Responsibility for Implementation

Vice President of Student Affairs

 

VP of Academic Affairs

Revised: 7/12/2001
Effective: 7/12/2001
Updated: 3/2009
Revised: 11/2005
Approved: President, 1/26/2016
Revised: President, 1/29/2018
Revised: President, 2/3/2022
Revised: President, 1/24/24

 

Formerly titled 6.3000R Student Conduct Code and Academic Integrity Code.